Please share some love: small business calls for help in the crisis

Holly Solazzo and her dog. Photo courtesy Holly Solazzo.
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Time to support small businesses, says pet accessory seller Holly Solazzo. By Molly Jones.

Small business owners are calling for support both during and after coronavirus for them to survive the current financial strain and aftermath.

Business owner of pet accessory company Jax and Co, Holly Solazzo, 30, said it is now more important than ever to support the small businesses you love.

“The only way these businesses will survive is if they have financial support and if customers actively support them now and when the pandemic is over,” she said.

Ms Solazzo encourages people to support their favourite small businesses through social media if they can’t afford to buy their products.

“If your favourite business has social media – share their page, share why you love them and help get there name out there, it is the most effective way to support a business and it is free!

“As a small business owner, we know times are tough for everyone but it costs nothing to tell someone about your favourite small businesses. Obviously if you can, purchase from them!

“We rely on customers to pay our bills, so if you can buy that cup of coffee, or get take away from your favourite restaurant, then do it,” Ms Solazzo said.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics defines a small business as employing fewer than 20 people and they account for 98 per cent of all Australian businesses.

Dog dressed in Jax and Co. Photo courtesy Holly Solazzo.

Sixty-two per cent of Australian businesses are sole traders with no employees, micro businesses with one to four employees account for 27 per cent, and small businesses with five to19 employees make up 8.5 per cent, Australian Bureau of Statistics figures show.

Ms Solazzo said small businesses were the backbone of our economy.

“Without them we would all suffer,” she said.

“That’s not me being biased because I have a business. Just think about your favourite store, your favourite coffee shop or restaurant – the majority are going to be small businesses, all of who are impacted by the pandemic.

“We aren’t entitled to a lot of benefits that medium to larger businesses are. I fear that many small businesses won’t survive this, especially those that have physical stores as well.”

Ms Solazzo worries many small businesses won’t survive the current turmoil.

“When they started talking about lockdown and restrictions in early April I was instantly concerned about how it would impact business and how I was going to pay bills,” Ms Solazzo said.


She said hers is an online business, and she is grateful for the support she has received from her social media following.

“I was concerned people wouldn’t be spending money at all but it appears for the most part that isn’t the case.

“Surprisingly, I have had more orders during the last four weeks with sales up by 220 per cent from the previous four weeks.

“I’m well aware that this won’t last, but people are shopping online about the same amount I get in the six weeks leading up to Christmas.”